Dividing Fences Information

Know your rights

Unfortunately it is a fact within the Fencing Industry that the most common disputes between neighbours revolve around boundary lines and You as the end consumer, should be aware of this.

In majority of cases you simply install your new dividing fences on existing fence lines. However, in the situation there are no existing fences or fence lines clearly marked out by a qualified surveyor, do not get a new fence installed without consulting the all parties involved direct.

Always check your land titles if you are not sure & show these to any company you may have contracted to install your new fences prior to installation commencement.

Make sure it is clearly understood by ALL parties involved in the erecting of the new or replacement fencing as it is ultimately the Home Owners Responsibilty for the accuracy of all boundary lines, underground cables & underground services. It is not the responsibility of the company you may employ to install the fencing on yours or your neighbours behalf.


State Government Fencing Legislation

Each state and territory has its own Privacy Fencing Legislation, and there may be differences between states and territories. If you need to check the legislation, you can obtain a copy online, by post, or in person.

NSW: Dividing Fences Act of 2010
Website: www.lpma.nsw.gov.au
Fact Sheet: PDF

Contact: 
T – 1300 052 637
P – 02 9228 666
F – 02 92334357

Land & Property Management Authority NSW Govt
Head Office – 1 Prince Albert Rd
Queens Square
Sydney NSW 2000

OR

NSW Attorney Generals Dept NSW
Website: www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au
Fact sheet: PDF
Contact: 1300 888 529


Local Government Fencing Legislation

Fencing regulations vary dramatically between different local, shire and regional councils such as materials to be used and maximum height permitted before you require their prior approval for installation. If you are in any doubt about the regulations in an area, it is highly recommended that you contact the local, regional or shire council direct. Also note that a majority of Housing Estates may also have specific regulations about fencing to which you must comply.

 

Dividing Fences Information

Know your rights

Unfortunately it is a fact within the Fencing Industry that the most common disputes between neighbours revolve around boundary lines and You as the end consumer, should be aware of this.

In majority of cases you simply install your new dividing fences on existing fence lines. However, in the situation there are no existing fences or fence lines clearly marked out by a qualified surveyor, do not get a new fence installed without consulting the all parties involved direct.

Always check your land titles if you are not sure & show these to any company you may have contracted to install your new fences prior to installation commencement.

Make sure it is clearly understood by ALL parties involved in the erecting of the new or replacement fencing as it is ultimately the Home Owners Responsibilty for the accuracy of all boundary lines, underground cables & underground services. It is not the responsibility of the company you may employ to install the fencing on yours or your neighbours behalf.


State Government Fencing Legislation

Each state and territory has its own Privacy Fencing Legislation, and there may be differences between states and territories. If you need to check the legislation, you can obtain a copy online, by post, or in person.

NSW: Dividing Fences Act of 2010
Website: www.lpma.nsw.gov.au
Fact Sheet: PDF

Contact: 
T – 1300 052 637
P – 02 9228 666
F – 02 92334357

Land & Property Management Authority NSW Govt
Head Office – 1 Prince Albert Rd
Queens Square
Sydney NSW 2000

OR

NSW Attorney Generals Dept NSW
Website: www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au
Fact sheet: PDF
Contact: 1300 888 529


Local Government Fencing Legislation

Fencing regulations vary dramatically between different local, shire and regional councils such as materials to be used and maximum height permitted before you require their prior approval for installation. If you are in any doubt about the regulations in an area, it is highly recommended that you contact the local, regional or shire council direct. Also note that a majority of Housing Estates may also have specific regulations about fencing to which you must comply.